Archives for February 2017

Finding Uncommon ground : re-thinking  working class identity politics in post Brexit Britain 

  Part One : Subtle Dialectics,Crude Thoughts  ‘In order to save the Party we had to destroy it’ (with  acknowledgement to Bert  Brecht) After the so called uprising of June 23/When  business and political leaders /had leaflets distributed /stating that the people/had forfeited their confidence/and could win it back only/by redoubled efforts  in another referendum /Would it not be easier in this case /for the government/to dissolve the people/and elect another?/Such a subtle dialectic/Trading places with  such crude thoughts. After the  attempted  coup of June 28/when members of the PLP/had leaflets distributed/stating that their leader/had forfeited their confidence /and could only win it back/by giving up the ghost/would it not be easier in this case also /to dissolve the membership/and elect a committee of psycho-pomps/to lead the now non-existent party/to a new underworld ?/Such a crude thought/In search of  subtle dialectic. I wrote this poem  because I was  invited to [Read More…]

BOTH SIDES OF THE LINE Stuart Hall and ‘New Ethnicities, then and now

In June  1992 Stuart Hall came to the University of East London to give the inaugural lecture for the Centre for New Ethnicities Research  to which I had just been appointed director. I had been working for a number of years at the Institute of Education developing an approach to  anti -racist work with young people  based on  ethnographic research  in schools, playgrounds, housing estates and neighbourhoods  in East London. The focus, then  as now,  was on trying to understand the impact of   economic change  on the livelihoods, life styles,  and life stories of  the people most directly affected and their families over a long period of time.  East London, and especially the    Isle of Dogs where much of this  work took place  was  then a front line of racial tension  between a long established  working class community traumatised by the closure of the docks, and  more recently arrived Bangladeshi [Read More…]

Ben Cohen Obituary Royal Society of Medicine

  Ben Cohen, Fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons, has  died  at the age of 101.  He was born into a family of poor Jewish immigrants who settled in the Glasgow Gorbals before the First World War. His father was a militant socialist and fled from Vitebsk to avoid both political and religious persecution under the Tsar. The son grew up  in the political culture of ‘red Clydeside’, attended Socialist Sunday School, and accompanied his father to many  meetings where he heard Jimmy Maxton and John Maclean  speak of social injustice, early experiences  which left a lasting impression on his political sympathies. He won a scholarship to Hutcheson’s Grammar School, where he excelled in Classics, but was persuaded  by his family  to study medicine at Glasgow University, where he qualified at the age of 22. He wanted to volunteer for the International Brigade during the Spanish Civil War but [Read More…]